Inside Bridgton

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Bridgton Hospital staff wore blue March 3 to raise awareness for colorectal cancer and to remind people in the Lakes Region that the disease can be prevented with painless, regular screenings.

I keep waiting for warmer weather; however, after a couple weeks of spring teaser, we seem to be back in the clutches of Old Man Winter. As I write this I am fearfully anticipating the Tuesday storm, but when my readers see this it will already be over. I’m hoping my anticipation is worse than the reality.

Big Night for amphibians

A sure sign of impending spring is “Big Night,” when amphibians, including yellow spotted salamanders, migrate to the vernal pools that are their breeding grounds. Big Night usually occurs in late March or early April and the little critters come out in force to get to their destination. Sometimes they have to cross roads in order to reach their breeding pools, which puts them in danger of being crushed by cars. To help minimize the carnage, many people in Bridgton gather together to help the little creatures safely complete their journey. I have helped out in past years on Dugway Road, and it was a fascinating and fun night out.

The Lakes Environmental Association in Bridgton offered a training session last week for people interested in helping the amphibians during their migration. If you were unable to attend the training but would still like to help out, please contact Mary Jewett at 647-8580 or mary@leamaine.org To learn more about the LEA visit www.mainelakes.org.

Colonoscopy could be lifesaver

On Friday, March 3, the staff at Bridgton Hospital wore blue to raise awareness for colorectal cancer and to remind people in the Lakes Region that the disease can be prevented with painless, regular screenings. Make sure to speak with your health care provider about scheduling a colonoscopy. I have had a colonoscopy so I know it is painless, only mildly inconvenient, and it could save your life, especially if you have a family history of colon cancer. And, if nothing unusual is discovered, you only need to have the test once every five years.

Bridgton Hospital also welcomes Robert Slattery as the new leader of its operations and business development projects. Slattery, who has over two decades of national and regional experience, is a strong advocate of patient-centered care, clinical integration and population health management. He is focused on supporting the teams of physicians, nurses and staff at both Bridgton and Rumford Hospitals in delivering the best possible care to the communities they serve.

Renovations and reopenings

The Morning Glory Diner at 78 Portland Rd. (Rte. 302) had been under renovation since Thanksgiving. It remained open for most of that time, but seating was significantly reduced as work was being done on the back room. Last Friday there was a ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially reopen the restaurant and show off its new space. I have not yet been there but I encourage everyone to stop by and see what the new room looks like.

Mr. Butcher, located at 19 Sandy Creek Rd. (a.k.a. “The Dump Road”) next to Paris Farmers Union, reopened March 11 after being closed for four weeks while the owner, Jim Moore, underwent knee replacement surgery. Moore is now up and about and will open the shop from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days a week for the next couple months. He will expand shop hours after that as his knee improves and as the summer season approaches. Stop by to say hello and wish him well.

St. Patrick’s Day supper

The Bridgton/Fryeburg Knights of Columbus are hosting the annual St. Patrick’s Day corned beef and cabbage public supper at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 18, at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 225 South High St. Advance tickets are $10 and $12at the door. Put on your Irish green and join them for a good traditional meal. For more information and to purchase advance tickets call Tom at 468-1522.

Socrates Café relocation

The popular Socrates Café discussion group, which used to meet in the Waterford Library, will now be meeting at the Bridgton Community Center, 15 Depot St. (behind Reny’s), for the foreseeable future. The group was outgrowing its space in the Waterford Library as more and more people were coming to the monthly meetings. The Community Center offers a larger space with easier access for wheelchairs.

The group, which is free and open to the public, meets on a Monday once a month to discuss a specific topic. Each session is moderated by someone chosen in the previous meeting.

The next meeting will be held at the Community Center on Monday, April 3, from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. The topic for discussion is: “What One Thing Do We Turn to for Joy and Gratitude?” and the moderator will be Therese Johnson. Light refreshments will be provided at the meeting. For more information call 583-6957.

Welcome Back, Coach

Finally, I would like to welcome Rick Marcella back as the head football coach at Bridgton Academy. Marcella was the academy’s football coach in the 1990s and early 2000s, but left in 2012 to take jobs in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Now he is back at BA and looking forward to beginning his work there in the fall.

Bridgton Hospital staff wore blue March 3 to raise awareness for colorectal cancer and to remind people in the Lakes Region that the disease can be prevented with painless, regular screenings.