Looking Back

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W.J. Winters Company operated out of a small building at the rear of a parking lot at 152 Main St. for several years before moving to 155 Warren Ave. The Birdland Restaurant was the next tenant, operating for a short time. A-1 Steak Pit took over the building and it later became the Chez Plaza Restaurant & Lounge. A spectacular fire destroyed the building in the early 1970s. Thomas Sing bought the lot, constructed a building closer to Main Street and opened Sing's Restaurant & lounge, specializing in Cantonese, Polynesian and American menu items. In 1976, Victor Lo and Henry Ko bought the building and the business and changed the name to the Polynesian Village Restaurant & Lounge. The Polynesian Village operated under several different owners before closing. To see more historical photos and artifacts, visit the Westbrook Historical Society at the Fred C. Wescott Building, 426 Bridge St. It is open Tuesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon, and the first Wednesday of each month at 1:30 p.m., September-June. Inquiries can be emailed to westhistorical@myfairpoint.net. The website is www.westbrookhistoricalsociety.org.

Aug. 12, 1992

After 20 years, Westbrook is closing its Sandy Hill dump, Saco Street, to all residents and businesses effective Jan. 1. All household rubbish will have to be left at the curb. The city maintains two containers at Sandy Hill where residents with stickers can dump household rubbish. The containers will be removed and the area closed.

Rosa Peterson, 310 Longfellow Place, doesn’t lie in a hammock drinking lemonade on summer days, although she’s earned the privilege. Nor does she call Regional Transportation when she whips off to a meeting of Westbrook Senior Citizens, of which she is president. She drives her own ’86 Olds. Here’s what one person used to dealing with senior citizens told Rosa: “You make me dizzy trying to keep up,” said Trish Flynn, activities director of Springbrook Nursing Care Center, where Rosa helps with games like bingo and wheelchair bowling. Such activities keep Rosa going from 9 a.m. to late in the afternoon. Rosa, who says she’s “between 50 and 100,” graduated from Westbrook High during the Depression.

By tracking trash trucks and asking a few questions, Cynthia K. Strout has won the promise of a review of Westbrook’s policies on trash pick-up. She lives in a condo at 17 Graham Road, and pays a commercial hauler to take away her rubbish. She also pays city taxes on her home. People who live in one-, two- or three-family homes get their rubbish hauled free by the city. When Strout’s trash gets to the Regional Waste System burner, it’s classified as commercial, not residential, and the hauler has to pay a higher price to dump it, a difference he passes along to Strout.

The Cornelia Warren Foundation is giving the city of Westbrook $35,000 for a lighted ice hockey rink on Lincoln Street that can be used for roller hockey in other seasons. Eventually, it could have artificial ice. An immediate goal is to keep hockey off the Stroudwater Street and East Bridge Street skating ponds, leaving them for recreational skaters.

In his 25 years as a guidance counselor at Westbrook High School, Jack Dawson has help hundreds of students pass through the doorway to adulthood. And every summer for the past 22 years, Dawson has been able to work with young athletes at his summer sports camps. Dawson ran a camp at North Yarmouth Academy for 10 years and has led the Jack Dawson Sports Camp at Waynflete School, Portland, for the past 12 years. “It’s the best six weeks of the year,” said Dawson.

Some Gorham residents say cars parked along the road in the Little Falls village area have made a dangerous intersection even worse. After hearing arguments from residents, who say the spaces are needed, and those who view the vehicles as a hazard, the Gorham Town Council decided to wait until their September meeting and more fact-finding before they make a decision.

Geoffrey Dyhrberg, son of Katherine Dyhrberg, Solomon Drive, Gorham, graduated recently from Boston College with a bachelor’s degree in education. During the same week, his mother graduated from Westbrook College with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

Aug. 14, 2002

Members of the Maine Deaf Senior Citizens group worked in near silence Friday, putting the finishing touches on a quit themed around Sept. 11 and patriotism. Gathered in Millbrook Estates on East Bridge Street in Westbrook, a few of the women would stop now and then and have a chat. June Carrier, a Westbrook resident who reads lips and can speak in conversational English or sign language, described the quilting project and the broader goals of the group she helped form 10 years ago. “We got together to do this so we don’t get old,” Carrier said. “We do one each year and this year we decided to focus on 9/11.” Next May the group will auction off the quilt in Boston at the national conference of the Deaf Senior Citizens of America.

The Gorham Town Council has approved impact fees on new homes as a way to help pay the cost of a new middle school currently under construction on Weeks Road. The impact fees, determined by the number of bedrooms in each new residence, are the first in a series of fees the Town Council could adopt as a way to help pay the cost of recent skyrocketing growth and to slow that grown down some. The fees will raise the price of new residential constriction anywhere from $315 to $3,150.

Stephen Cotreau is the director of CAP Quality Care methadone clinic, on Delta Drive in Westbrook, which opened last October. A staff of two nurses, one doctor and 13 counselors works with 517 patients from throughout southern Maine, offering not just a substitute to opiates, but counseling, advice and medical treatment. Cotreau has been working with Westbrook Police Chief Steven Roberts on the problem of overdoses and methadone.

This year, as in those past, the Gorham Family Fair offers something for everyone, beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, with the Gorham Trails Land Trust 5K and 1K races, with runners departing from Gorham High School. The Maine Professional Truck Drivers Association is a new addition this year to both the parade and the display area. The Maine State Police will be joining the truck drivers group and providing a challenge course with impaired-vision goggles. Entertainment includes a variety of musical performances, and fireworks begin at 9 p.m.

From the Westbrook Police Log: A Settlers Road man went to answer a persistent knocking at his door and discovered that some kids had tied a string to his knocker, stretched it to a shadowy area and were bothering him from there. A business owner at 159 Bridgton Road reported that an ex-employee had threatened her. A Sawyer Road man reported that someone had jimmied his window so it wouldn’t lock in an attempt to break in later.

W.J. Winters Company operated out of a small building at the rear of a parking lot at 152 Main St. for several years before moving to 155 Warren Ave. The Birdland Restaurant was the next tenant, operating for a short time. A-1 Steak Pit took over the building and it later became the Chez Plaza Restaurant & Lounge. A spectacular fire destroyed the building in the early 1970s. Thomas Sing bought the lot, constructed a building closer to Main Street and opened Sing’s Restaurant & lounge, specializing in Cantonese, Polynesian and American menu items. In 1976, Victor Lo and Henry Ko bought the building and the business and changed the name to the Polynesian Village Restaurant & Lounge. The Polynesian Village operated under several different owners before closing.

To see more historical photos and artifacts, visit the Westbrook Historical Society at the Fred C. Wescott Building, 426 Bridge St. It is open Tuesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon, and the first Wednesday of each month at 1:30 p.m., September-June. Inquiries can be emailed to westhistorical@myfairpoint.net. The website is www.westbrookhistoricalsociety.org.