Looking Back

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F.G. Hay, father of John W. Hay, operated his funeral business out of this building at 830 Main St., Westbrook, before moving it to 795 Main St. Peters Fruit Store, also known as Peters Tea Room, moved in. Chris Peters operated the store. The building was demolished in 1975 to make way for the widening of Church Street. To see more historical photos and artifacts, visit the Westbrook Historical Society at the Fred C. Wescott Building, 426 Bridge St. It is open Tuesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon, and the first Wednesday of each month at 1:30 p.m., September-June. Inquiries can be emailed to westhistorical@myfairpoint.net. The website is www.westbrookhistoricalsociety.org.

Dec. 9, 1992

University of Southern Maine officials could consider abolishing fraternities if criminal and behavior problems continue. That action is just one option being discussed following a series of incidents, which include the arrests of two fraternity presidents and a prison term for one partygoer who raped a woman in a frat house bathroom. Gorham police and USM officials, who have met three times this fall, say they have had enough. Fraternity executive boards also were invited to the meetings, but only Delta Chi President Todd Newcomb and Thomas Cote, leader of Sigma Nu, have attended, according to Gorham Police Chief Edward J. Tolan. Joseph Austin, USM’s director of student life, confirmed Friday that although officials are not currently taking steps to revoke any frat charters, the option is there if things get worse.

The Westbrook City Council agreed Monday to have the city co-sign a note for $25,000 so that the Stephen W. Manchester American Legion Post can fix up its post home on Dunn Street. The city owns the land and Fleet Bank won’t lend the money unless the city signs the note, too. Robert Burton, treasurer of the post’s building committee, said $8,000 has been invested in building improvements over the past two years. The $25,000 would pay for, among other things, ladies’ and men’s room on the first and second floors, concession area, windows, flooring, an enlarged kitchen and better lights.

Lance McCleish hit the streets as Gorham’s newest patrolman last week. He moved to town from Belfast and is looking forward to serving the community. The New Jersey native, whose father and grandfather were cops, graduated from the Maine Criminal Justice Academy last May.

Eighty-one-year-old Helen Rowe Morton’s first visit to Gorham from Oakhurst, California, since 1964 inspired family members to get together for a huge Rowe family Thanksgiving dinner. Hiring the former two-room schoolhouse Helen once attended, now White Rock Community Club House, they bought four huge turkeys and fixings and gathered at the clubhouse the night before to prepare and socialize. On Thanksgiving Day, all 72 family members sat down to a feast and a time for enjoying relatives – in many instances, for the first time. Helen arrived Nov. 16 with her daughter and son-in-law, Elinor and Bill Greenwood, and stayed until Dec. 1.

Dec. 11, 2002

A national reinsurance company now based in Portland announced plans Friday to move its corporate headquarters to a planned $16 million office building in downtown Westbrook. Core Inc. and a subsidiary, Disability RMS, plan to move 425 workers by April 2004 into a 135,000-square-foot office building that will be constructed on Bridge Street where Stultz Electric is now. The city has committed to a $6 million parking garage next to the building, and also plans a boardwalk that will connect the office building to the downtown. “It’s been a public and private partnership,” said developer Tim Flannery, who will pay for the construction of the office building. A tax-increment financing district is giving Flannery a break on property taxes so he can lower the rental price of the building.

Laura Randall told Westbrook city councilors she didn’t want to have to come back to them with one of her sons in a cast because he’d been hit by a car speeding through her neighborhood. “We don’t want to have to live like this. It’s getting worse every day,” she said. About 20 of Randall’s neighbors along Forest Street came to the Highway Safety Committee meeting Monday night to demand the city slow traffic on their road. Administrative Assistant Jerre Bryant gave councilors a variety of traffic calming techniques to consider, including speed bumps and tables, narrower roads, lower speed limits and traffic circles.

Kelley Roberts recently started a day care center at her home on Lover’s Lane in Gorham. She is license to take up to eight children, and currently has openings. Her day care is called Precious Footsteps. She can accommodate children 6 weeks to 12 years old.

A committee appointed to study the possibility of building a new access road to Gorham High School and the athletic fields beyond it met for the first time this week. The committee, chaired by Council Phil Dugas, was appointed last month after residents of Morrill Avenue urged the council to consider building a new road to South Street. They told the council that increased traffic, often traveling at high speeds, had made their lives miserable.

F.G. Hay, father of John W. Hay, operated his funeral business out of this building at 830 Main St., Westbrook, before moving it to 795 Main St. Peters Fruit Store, also known as Peters Tea Room, moved in. Chris Peters operated the store. The building was demolished in 1975 to make way for the widening of Church Street. To see more historical photos and artifacts, visit the Westbrook Historical Society at the Fred C. Wescott Building, 426 Bridge St. It is open Tuesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon, and the first Wednesday of each month at 1:30 p.m., September-June. Inquiries can be emailed to westhistorical@myfairpoint.net. The website is www.westbrookhistoricalsociety.org.